British Columbia Aboriginal Network on Disability Society (BCANDS)

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 Best Practices 2014 - 2015  2014 Deryck Thomson Award   2013 Dr. Nancy Hall Award   2013 BCMA Award   Award

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BCANDS recipient of the March of Dimes Canada – 2015 Judge George Ferguson National Award!!!

071BCANDS is very pleased and honoured to have been selected for this truly great honor and accepted the award on September 30th in Toronto!!

The March of Dimes Canada Judge George Ferguson Award was created in 1981 and named in honour of Former March of Dimes President Judge George Ferguson. The award is presented annually to a recipient who contributes in an outstanding way by enabling equality and full community participation for people with disabilities throughout Canada.

March of Dimes Canada Celebration

Thank you March of Dimes Canada!


Cick on the Image below to take a 10 question informational quiz about BCANDS!


bcands newest logoWho we are:

The British Columbia Aboriginal Network on Disability Society, or as more commonly known, BCANDS, is an award winning, provincial, not for profit, charitable Society serving the unique and diverse disability and health resource / support service needs of the Aboriginal population of British Columbia. BCANDS is a “stand alone” organization and the only organization of its type in Canada. Incorporated in 1991, BCANDS enjoys over 24 years of successfully delivering Aboriginal disability and health programs and services across British Columbia.

Aboriginal persons in British Columbia and across Canada continue to deal with the generational effects that European contact has had on all aspects of our lives. It is well documented that the health and disability status of Aboriginal people in British Columbia and Canada, is significantly lower than that of our non-Aboriginal population. Many Aboriginal communities are additionally affected by minimal economical and employment opportunities, community remoteness, limited community access to necessary disability, health and social services, their associated professionals, limited community amenities and so forth. Demands and expectations placed on Aboriginal communities and organizational leadership are high from their membership, with their membership identifying multiple priorities within the community or organization, all of which compete for any available financial resources. Understanding this, leadership within Aboriginal communities and organizations across British Columbia are often forced to make difficult decisions in regard to priority programs, services and specific funding allocations made available. Due to these important and ever increasing community and organizational needs, specialized disability and health support services may be minimal with only limited resources available to the membership, leaving the individual, their family and support system(s) at times isolated and frustrated.

BCANDS may be able to help.

BCANDS provides a vast array of services to eligible clients and organizations, both within Aboriginal communities and within British Columbia’s urban and rural centres. If you are an Aboriginal person living with a disability, residing within the province of British Columbia, or an on-reserve organization requiring health information / resources and support services, BCANDS may be able to assist.

Click here to be redirected to our Request for Disability Services Page

Click here to be redirected to our Health Resource / Information and Support Services Centre Page


“BCANDS wishes to respectfully acknowledge the traditional territory of the Coast Salish Nation of Esquimalt on which our main office is located. We further wish to acknowledge those organizations and communities across British Columbia, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal, who assist us in our work.”

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